This fireside chat recap is from the first day of FreightWaves’ Global Supply Chain Week. Day 1 focuses on the military, aerospace and manufacturing.

FIRESIDE CHAT TOPIC: Simba chain: demystifying blockchain for defense supply chains

DETAILS: An efficient and verifiable blockchain can be created and managed almost by drag and drop, which democratizes the use of technology.

SPEAKER: Jeffrey Curtis, Vice President, Defense and Supply Chain, Simba Chain. (The chat was led by Patrick Duffy, President of Blockchain in Transport Alliance.)

BIO: Curtis is a senior defense business reform leader with 34 years of strategic problem solving experience for large, complex organizations. A retired member of the Senior Executive Service and a recognized expert in supply chain, metrics and analytics, he held senior positions in the Department of Defense and is now Vice President of Defense and Supply Chain at SIMBA Chain, a blockchain startup. Curtis is also president of his own consulting firm, JCTEB LLC.

IMPORTANT QUOTES FROM CURTIS

“The only version of the truth is just so important. Knowing what you have, where it is, who has it is terribly important. You don’t want it on two sets of books. You don’t want me to think I still have it even though I sent it to you. …. Or where is it? Almost as bad, I think you have it, you think I have it, and it isn’t in any of our books. “

“Completing an audit was a success just to get it done. Passing it was the goal, but I think we were realistic about just making it. There was one sentence we didn’t want to hear; it was called “pencils down”. It’s all so mixed up, I can’t even do this, I can’t even check it out. “

“At some point there was an entity within DOD that said, ‘I want blockchain. ‘And when his people said, “Do what?” The answer was, “I want blockchain.” I don’t know why, just “I heard about it.” I think there is a quote from an admiral from the First or Second World War: “I don’t know what this logistics thing is, but I want some of it.” It’s similar. But now we’re getting over it. … It works its way into the real mainstream. “